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Transcultural. Transnational. Transformation.
seeing, writing and reading performance across cultures 2011

Australasian Association for Theatre, Drama and Performance Studies Conference

28 June – 1 July 2011, Monash University, Clayton Campus

The 2011 Australasian Association for Theatre, Drama and Performance Studies (ADSA) conference seeks to act as a forum to explore, bring together and/or set in opposition inter-, intra- and cross-cultural performances, performativities, receptions of performance, visions, borrowings, understandings, practices, theories and ethical ponderings about performance.

ADSA is the peak academic association promsoting the study of drama in any performing medium throughout the region. ADSA represents members of staff and postgraduate students of Australasian institutions of tertiary education who are engaged in teaching, research and practice in theatre, drama and performance studies. Directors of associated theatres and members of the theatrical profession are also active members.

Keynote Speakers

'Let the Games Begin': Pageants, Protests, lndigeneity

Photo: Helen Gilbert

Professor Helen Gilbert

What are the chief pleasures and tensions embedded in the circulation of indigenous performances as global commodities made available for 'reading across cultures?' To probe this question, my paper focuses on the Olympic Games as a potent, if highly controversial, stimulus for the expression — and consumption — of indigenity in the neo-liberal marketplace. While the signal events for my analysis are the Sydney, Salt Lake City and Vancouver Olympics, all in the first decade of the twenty-first century, a longer historical view will help to weigh the exoticising effects of spectacle against the argued benefits of national and global visibility. Specific pageants and protests are discussed as constituent parts of performance clusters intricately connected to each other by the spatial, economic and conceptual structures of individual host cities. Conceptually, the argument draws from recent work in cultural geography and urban studies as well as in performance theory. The overall aim is to begin a comparative materialist analysis of pro- and anti-Games performances of indigeneity while offering some grounded theoretical insights into the ways in which such 'inhabitations' map into local and translocal commodity cultures.

podcast icon Download a recording of this paper in MP3 format

'That primitive box space' - transculturalism and black modern dance

Photo: Professor Rachel Fensham

Professor Rachel Fensham

This paper considers the choreography and work of New York 'black dance' artist Eleo Pomare in the Netherlands and Australia during the 1960s and 1970s. With the 'double consciousness' of black subjects from the transatlantic (Gilroy), Pomare helped to create a radical dance aesthetics based on observation of everyday life, poetic expression, and social commentary. However, this 'angry dancer' adopted a position outside cultural hierarchies, by leading an integrated dance company and challenging black and white stereotypes. In discussing Pomare's history, I will consider his role in challenging racial segregation in the Australian cultural establishment through the discourses of black power and modern dance embodiment;; strategies which have been adopted subsequently by indigenous dance practices.

podcast icon Download a recording of this paper in MP3 format

Mondialisation or World Forming in The Flying Circus Project

Photo: Ong Keng Sen

Ong Keng Sen

In The Creation Of The World, Jean Luc Nancy introduces the term mondialization or world forming, the making of a world. He prefers this to the term globalization for a variety of reasons. Mondialization evokes, for him, an expanding process throughout the expanse of human beings, cultures and nations. This is unlike globalization that seems to him to be the undifferentiated sphere of a unitotality. Nancy discusses globalization as "the suppression of all world-forming of the world", as "an unprecedented geopolitical, economic, and ecological castastrophe". Globalization leads to the opposite of an inhabitable world, to the un-world [immonde]. His primary concern is to create a world that is "the contrary of a global injustice against the backdrop of general equivalence".

I would like to discuss The Flying Circus (FCP), an artist laboratory that takes place in different sites in Asia, as an instance of intercultural performance, through a close reading of Nancy. The FOP can be said to have occurred due to the increased mobility in a globalized world. It was initiated in 1996 when the art world exploded with cultural and artistic exchanges, its artists were both self-confident and hungry to experience the world. Since 2004, most of these artists come from city centers or art metropolises; they are often trained in universities in Europe or the US; they are acutely aware of the speed of world economy and the power of information revolution in its electronic forms; they participate with savvy in the contemporary art market; they embrace hybrid identities, multiplicities as often they come from diasporic backgrounds; they are actively engaged in creation, expression and art in their communities of choice. Despite all this, I would like to argue that the FOP is a study of world forming, closer to mondialization rather than globalization.

podcast icon Download a recording of this paper in MP3 format

Biographies for keynote speakers.

Schedule

The Conference is spread over four days. This year the main conference will be preceded by a special event specifically designed to cater for Early Career Researchers and Postgraduate students.

Special Event
Tuesday 28 June
  1. Special Early Career Researcher (ECR) and Postgraduate Workshop.
    Following the success of the inaugural ECR/Postgraduate session at the ADSA Canberra Conference 2010, organisers are once again offering a special event for postgraduate students and researchers.
    Morning & afternoon tea and lunch will be provided.
  2. Opening Night.
    Welcome to Country and Official Opening of the Conference.
    Drinks and Light Refreshments will be provided.
Day One
Wednesday 29 June
  1. First Keynote Address
  2. Papers from attending delegates.
  3. Workshops
    Morning & afternoon tea and lunch will be provided.
Day Two
Thursday 30 June
  1. Second Keynote Address
  2. Papers from attending delegates.
  3. Workshops
    Morning & afternoon tea and lunch will be provided.
Day Three
Friday 1 July
  1. Third Keynote Address
  2. Papers from attending delegates.
  3. Workshops
    Morning & afternoon tea and lunch will be provided.
  4. Conference Dinner
  5. Delegates will need to book for the Conference Dinner. The Conference Dinner is not included as part of the registration cost.

Day Four
Saturday 2 July
  1. Performance as Research Colloquium
    Light Lunch and tea and coffee will be provided.
  2. While the lunch and attendance at the seminar is free, we ask that you register your intention to attend via the conference website.

*Delegates: If you have any amendments to the schedule you wish to be made, please contact Cheyney Caddy.

Program and Abstracts

Conference program (PDF)

Conference abstracts (PDF)

Conference dinner

The Conference Dinner will take place on the closing night of the conference (Friday 1 July).
Delegates will need to book for the Conference Dinner. The Conference Dinner is not included as part of the registration cost. The Dinner will cost AU$70.
The venue for the Conference Dinner will be confirmed shortly.
A menu will also be provided shortly.

Register online at the Faculty of Arts eCart

Complimentary buses to Clayton

Monash University is providing complimentary chartered Buses for ADSA Conference delegates that will be travelling daily from Federation Square in the Melbourne CBD to the Clayton Campus. The Buses will depart the bus loop at Russell Street Federation Square every morning at 8am and deliver delegates to the Conference venues as the Clayton campus in time for the morning sessions. Buses will also leave Clayton campus in the evenings and deliver delegates back to Federation Square.

Download the bus timetable here.

Registration

All participants must register to attend the conference. Registration includes three lunches as well as morning and afternoon tea. Registration also includes a program and a booklet of abstracts.

Registration fees

Type Early bird registration
Ends 14 May 2011
Full registration
Full $AUD 330 $AUD 380
Concession   $AUD 180 *
Daily Registration   $AUD 130
Conference Dinner   $AUD 70
Special Early Career Researcher (ECR) and Postgraduate Workshop on Tuesday 28   Free

* $180 (Flat Subsidised Rate - No Early Bird Offer available)

Register online at the Faculty of Arts eCart

All participants must register to attend the conference. Registration includes three lunches as well as morning and afternoon tea. Registration also includes a program and a booklet of abstracts.

Please Note: All speakers must be ADSA members.
ADSA membership form

For further details of ADSA membership please contact:
Loretta Calverley
Email: L.Calverley@latrobe.edu.au
Phone: +61 3 9479 2342

Other news and events

Information regarding performances, workshops and other special events will be posted here shortly.

Performance as Research Colloquium

The ADSA Conference Convenors are delighted to announce that the Centre for Theatre and Performance Studies at Monash University will be hosting a special Performance as Research Collquium on Saturday 2nd of July from 11am - 2pm. The seminar will be chaired by Professor Peter Snow and will be used as a forum to discuss recent developments in the field. Light lunch and tea and coffee will be provided. While the lunch and attendance at the seminar is free, we ask that you register your intention to attend via the conference website.

Information on Melbourne

For detailed information about Melbourne, including a guide to what’s on, places to visit, shopping, dining and nightlife, visit the City of Melbourne visitor site.

Melbourne city tours

For an overview of what Melbourne has to offer, you might like to do a Melbourne City Tour. Melbourne is known as the fashion capital of Australia, as well as being a very multicultural city you will find everything from boutique shopping to exquisite dining from cultures around the world. Melbourne city tours will guide you over and through Melbourne city and give you a glimpse into the fabulous lifestyle Melbournians lead.

Phillip Island penguin tour

Phillip Island boasts two of Australia’s greatest natural attractions, Seal Rocks and the Penguin Reserve. Located 1.5 hours drive south of Melbourne, join an afternoon tour to visit the spectacular Cape Woolamai Surf Beach, Nobbies and Seal Rocks. At sunset witness hundreds of Little Penguins as they waddle ashore onto the Island’s Summerland Beach and pose for the visitors along the way. This private penguin viewing is hosted by a ranger, who will fill you in on the daily lives of the little penguins and answer any questions you may have.

Further information and to make a booking for the Phillip Island Penguin Tour.

Queen Victoria market foodies dream tour

The Queen Victoria Market is a major landmark in Melbourne is the largest open-air market in the Southern Hemisphere. It is the only surviving 19th century Market in the Melbourne central business district and has become significant to the culture of Melbourne. A highlight of the markets is the ‘Foodies Dream Tour’, which is a gourmet tour of the three main produce sections of the Market. Discover the newest foods and trends in the company of a fully qualified Market Guide. Meet some of the specialist traders and pick up valuable hints in selecting produce while sampling the goods.

When: Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays (excludes public holidays)
Time: 10.00 am - 12:00pm
Cost: $35 includes generous samplings, a coffee and an environmentally friendly shopping bag.

For further information and to make a booking:
P: 9320 5822
E: tours@qvm.com.au

Disclaimer

Please be advised that the above tours are offered by separate operators, and do not have any connection with Monash University or the ADSA Conference Organising Committee. This information is provided to conference delegates on a general basis and is the delegate’s responsibility to research, make a booking and pay for the service provided directly with the supplier.

Information on Monash

Centre for Theatre and Performance Studies

The 2011 ADSA Conference 'Transcultural. Transnational. Transformation.' is being hosted by Monash University's Centre for Theatre and Performance Studies which is located at the Clayton Campus. The Centre offers the largest comprehensive theatre and performance program offered by an Australian university, with degrees that explore theatre and performance in both theory and practice.

Clayton Campus

The Clayton campus was opened in 1961 as the first Monash University campus. Clayton is the largest Australian campus (100 hectares) and has more than 23,000 students. All ten Monash faculties offer courses at Clayton. Clayton campus is located on the corner of Wellington Road and Princes Highway, 20 km from Melbourne's city centre. Information about travelling to Clayton Campus can be accessed via the Monash university Website.

A useful map of the Clayton Campus is also available.

Travel and directions

Information about traveling to and from the conference.

Accomodation

Accomodation information.

Prizes

ADSA recognises outstanding scholarship in different areas of theatre, drama and performance studies through a series of prizes that will be awarded at the ADSA Conference 2011. These awards include:

Geoffrey Milne Bursary: The Bursary is designed to assist students in the first year of their PhD at a University in Australia or New Zealand with the costs of attending the annual ADSA Conference. Valued at approximately $250, the Bursary provides funding for Conference Registration and for attendance at the Conference Dinner.

The Bursary is awarded based on a nomination submitted by the student’s Supervisor.

For more information see:

http://www.adsa.edu.au/prizes/geoffrey-milne-bursary-1

Marlis Thiersch Prize: For research excellence in an English-language article published anywhere in the world in the broad field of theatre and performance studies.

Philip Parsons Prize: For a senior student (third year, honours or postgraduate) undertaking a performance as research project.

Rob Jordan Prize: For the best book on a theatre, drama or performance studies related subject published in the previous two years.

Veronica Kelly Prize: For the Best Postgraduate Paper presented at an ADSA conference.

Membership of ADSA is required to be eligible for these awards.
For more information visit the ADSA webpage

Information for presenters

Coming soon.

Links

Links: Monash University

Monash University Home Page
Monash School of Music - Conservatorium
Monash University British Music Studies Research Group
Monash University Academy of Performing Arts

Links: Libraries and Archives

Monash University Sir Louis Matheson Library
National Library of Australia, Canberra
National Archives, Canberra
State Library of Victoria, Melbourne

Links: General

Melbourne Airport
Tourist Information, City of Melbourne
Tourist Information, State of Victoria
National Gallery of Victoria [Melbourne CBD]
Federation Square [Melbourne CBD]

Inquiries

Please Contact the Conference Convenors.

Convenors

Dr. Maryrose Casey
Director Performance Research Unit
Centre for Theatre and Performance Studies
Building 68, Monash University, Clayton Campus VIC 3800.
Phone: (+61 3) 9905 2970
Email: Maryrose.Casey@monash.edu

Dr. William Peterson
Senior Lecturer and Director
Centre for Theatre and Performance Studies
Building 68, Monash University, Clayton Campus VIC 3800.
Phone: (+61 3) 9905 9351
Email: Will.Peterson@monash.edu

Past and Present Conferences and Seminars

Visit our archives of conferences and seminars - recordings of many papers are available for download: